• Human-Translated Fact Sheets and Video
  • Large Print

Education

    Results: 16

  • Adult Education (2)
    HH-0500

    Adult Education

    HH-0500

    Programs, usually offered by community adult schools or evening classes at local high schools, that provide instruction in fundamental learning skills for adults who have never attended school or have interrupted formal schooling and need to raise their level of education to increase their self-confidence and/or prepare for an occupation. Emphasis is placed on basic reading, language and mathematics.
  • Alternative Education (1)
    HD-0500

    Alternative Education

    HD-0500

    Educational programs at all levels within or outside the formal education system that provide innovative and flexible instruction, curriculums, grading systems, learning environments or degree requirements, a return to traditional educational values, or other alternatives to the ordinary system of instruction.
  • Colleges/Universities (1)
    HD-6000.1300

    Colleges/Universities

    HD-6000.1300

    Postsecondary educational institutions that offer the highest possible level of formal learning in various fields and disciplines for people who meet entry level requirements and are interested in an advanced education. Included are public and private colleges and universities that offer a four year, undergraduate course of study, which award a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) or Bachelor of Science (B.S. or B. Sc.) degree to successful graduates; and those that offer postgraduate study at masters or doctorate levels in addition to an undergraduate program.
  • Community Adult Schools (1)
    HD-6000.1400

    Community Adult Schools

    HD-6000.1400

    Public postsecondary educational institutions administered by local districts that provide learning opportunities for adults who want to learn new skills, prepare for a new career or advancement in their present job, earn an eighth grade or high school diploma, improve personal skills in English or another language, become a more knowledgeable consumer, or prepare to assume a more effective role as a participating member of the community.
  • Early Literacy Development Programs (1)
    HH-4500.1800

    Early Literacy Development Programs

    HH-4500.1800

    Programs that promote pre-literacy and language development skills in children from birth to age five with the objective of preparing them to read. Program activities are both educational and social and focus on helping participants develop oral language skills, expand their vocabulary, develop the concept of a word, have exposure to printed words and connect them to stories, develop phonological and phoneme awareness (sounds associated with letters and words), and recognize letters of the alphabet and connect them to words. Specific activities that promote early literacy development include reading aloud, summarizing stories read, conversations and dialogue, learning new words, exposure to books, rhyming and singing, imitating sounds, identifying syllables, writing and naming letters, attaching sounds to letters, and recognizing words. Programs may be formal or informal, and may include parent participation. Classes are often held at schools, churches, libraries and community recreation centers.
  • Family Literacy Programs (2)
    HH-4500.2000

    Family Literacy Programs

    HH-4500.2000

    Programs offered by libraries, local literacy councils and other organizations that provide reading, writing and mathematics instruction which targets both parents and children. Included are Even Start programs, federally-funded intergenerational literacy programs for low-income families with children age eight or younger which integrate early childhood education, adult basic education/literacy programs, ESL, GED, and parenting education with the objective of breaking the cycle of poverty and illiteracy and providing both adults and children with essential life skills. The programs build on existing resources; focus on family/parent literacy, parenting skills and child development; and combine the efforts of a variety of local organizations including Head Start programs, libraries, literacy councils, local educational agencies, institutions of higher education and other public and nonprofit entities. Support services may include transportation, child care, nutrition assistance, meals, health care and referrals for employment services, mental health services, substance abuse and other identified needs.
  • GED/High School Equivalency Test Instruction (1)
    HH-0500.2500-250

    GED/High School Equivalency Test Instruction

    HH-0500.2500-250

    Programs that provide instruction for adults and eligible minors who have elected to take a series of tests which measure the extent to which they have gained the knowledge, skills and understanding ordinarily acquired through a high school education. Instruction and testing focus on writing, social studies, science, reading and mathematics. Individuals who pass the tests receive a high school equivalency certificate.
  • Health Education (3)
    LH-2700

    Health Education

    LH-2700

    Programs that provide information that improves the public's understanding of living and working conditions and other factors that safeguard their health and prevent or reduce the risk of injury, disease, disability and premature death. Health education programs help people make informed decisions about matters which affect their personal health and the health of others. They inform the public of health and safety hazards, help people modify behaviors that compromise their health, encourage people to take advantage of early detection programs and provide information about treatment and rehabilitation options for people who have an illness, injury or disability. They also provide anticipatory information or guidance to help people deal with and understand specific medical procedures, being hospitalized or other necessary interfaces with the health care system.
  • Life Skills Education (1)
    PH-6200.4600

    Life Skills Education

    PH-6200.4600

    Programs that offer training which focuses on the knowledge and skills an individual may need to live independently or make a successful transition to independent living. Participants may include runaway youth who are living on their own, youth who because of age can no longer be maintained in foster care, new widows, victims of domestic abuse, people who have previously been homeless, and others who have lived in an environment in which decision making and responsibilities of daily living have been handled by another as well as people currently living independently who want to be more effective. Training may address job search and retention, money management, insurance, taxes, rental agreements, vehicle purchase, nutrition, home management, health care, legal emancipation for teens and other similar topics.
  • Literacy Programs (1)
    HH-4500

    Literacy Programs

    HH-4500

    Programs that provide reading and writing instruction for individuals of all ages who are unable to read or write at a functional level. Some programs interpret literacy more broadly and also help people develop speaking, computation and problem solving skills with the objective of ensuring that they develop levels of proficiency they will need to become self sufficient and function well in society.
  • Mental Health Information/Education (5)
    RR-5150

    Mental Health Information/Education

    RR-5150

    Programs that provide information through a variety of channels that improves the public's understanding of mental health and mental illness; the nature, etiology, diagnosis and treatment or management of specific mental disorders; and strategies for reducing the incidence of problems where possible. Mental health education programs help people make informed decisions about matters that affect their personal mental health and that of others. They inform the public of the risk factors and signs of mental health problems, encourage people to take advantage of early detection programs, help people modify behaviors that compromise their own mental health and provide support for family members and friends who are coping with mental illness or other mental health issues that have affected a loved one.
  • Parenting Education (3)
    PH-6100

    Parenting Education

    PH-6100

    Programs that provide classes, workshops or other educational opportunities for parents or potential parents who want to acquire the knowledge and skills to be effective in their parenting role.
  • Preschools (1)
    HD-1800.6500

    Preschools

    HD-1800.6500

    Programs that provide educational experiences and activities for children who are younger than compulsory school age, supplement parental care and home play and stimulate intellectual, social, emotional and motor skills development. Activities generally include preacademic skill development such as shape, color and number recognition; active outdoor play; observation of nature and pets; dancing and rhythms; block building; playhouse activities; games; simple excursions outside the school; stories and picture books. Children are also given a nutritious snack and/or meal and a period for adequate rest, and are taught basic cleanliness and good health habits.
  • Public Awareness/Education (1)
    TJ-6500

    Public Awareness/Education

    TJ-6500

    Programs that utilize a wide variety of materials including pamphlets and other literature, media presentations, speakers, workshops, directories, newsletters and outreach and prevention programs to make the public aware of the human service needs of the community, the resources that are available to meet those needs, and the issues which are relevant to specific social problems and the measures that have been proposed for their solution.
  • Safer Sex Education (1)
    LJ-8000.8000

    Safer Sex Education

    LJ-8000.8000

    Programs that provide information regarding practices that reduce the risk of an individual contracting a disease, including AIDS, through sexual activity.
  • Veteran Education Benefits (2)
    HL-8000.1800-900

    Veteran Education Benefits

    HL-8000.1800-900

    Programs administered by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs or other organizations that provide educational financial assistance for veterans and service personnel and their eligible dependents. Veterans and service personnel who served on active duty between January 31, 1955 and January 1, 1977 for specified periods of time are eligible for a variety of education benefits under the GI Bill including a stipend for tuition assistance at approved educational institutions. Veterans and service personnel who entered active duty after January 1, 1977 may participate in a voluntary contributory plan in which the individual's savings for a future education are administered and augmented by the government. Partial educational assistance is also available to the survivors of deceased or disabled veterans whose death or permanent and total disability was service-connected; and to the spouses and children of servicemen and women who have been listed for more than 90 days as missing in action, captured in the line of duty or forcibly detained by a foreign power.
 
Processing...


Driving Walking/Biking Public Transit  Get Directions